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Are You Getting In The Way?

Wednesday, August 16, 2017 - Joe Kiedinger

Most leaders I speak with in regards to the subject of micromanaging will tell you that they don’t. They believe in “empowering their people to make decisions”. However, when I dig deeper and ask employees if they are micromanaged, many say, “yes”. Their typical response sounds like this, “I just wish they (the leader) would trust me to do my job.”

IMG_2564.jpgOur unique internal motivators can accidentally get in the way of ingenuity and innovation. For example, perfectionists, by nature will micromanage. They have internal drivers that move them to dive in the details and meddle in people’s work. They become picky and over critical. However, when made aware, these leaders can devise a plan to improve the process so they do not need to dive in as deeply (as difficult as that is for them). 

Personally, I rely on my team for process and task execution. This area is not my forte so there are times when I don’t give enough direction. This too can be detrimental on the opposite side of the spectrum. The bottom line is this: we all get in our own way on this leadership journey. We must ask questions and self-reflect on where we may be interfering with progress.

Our intentions are never to interfere, our actions can send a different message.
What message are you sending? There is a simple question to ask those you lead to gain some clarity. “What should I stop doing, continue doing, and start doing to better support you?”

Get after it!

Joe Kiedinger

ACTION PLAN: Ask the question!

 
Photo: Our Golden Retriever, Harvey, is not letting Amelia swing on the swing. He always interrupts her progress and blocks her path. His internal motivations are simply to relax and soak up
affection, but instead he prevents Amelia from doing her very best. 

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Sometimes, all it takes is a little inspiration.

Understanding where others are coming from is critical in communicating and working toward a common cause.